“I’d like to be remembered as somebody who could rock your soul or make you cry with a song” -Gregg Allman

Multiple GrammyRock And Roll Hall of Fame in his pocket and the author of popular rock hits like “Melissa” and “Midnight Rider,” Gregg Allman also known as Father of Southern Rock is no more.  In 2007, diagnosed with Hepatitis C and a liver transplant in 2010 indicates that he was not well and was suffering from some health problems for a long time. Long-haired and enduring, Paragon of ’70s rock, surviving addictions, numerous break-ups, and a string of lethal tragedies that dotted the course of his entire life.

Gregory LeNoir Allman was born on December 8, 1947 in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. After his father’s murder in 1949, the Gregg, his younger brother Duane, his eventual music partner were forced to send the boys to military school while their mother was working to get her CPA. Gregg saved up money from a paper route and bought a guitar that was appropriated by his brother.

After playing in bands like the Untils, the Shufflers, the Escorts and the Y-Teens, the both took their chances and formed a new band Allman Joys on the in 1965. They often played six sets a night, seven nights a week, and eventually moved to Los Angeles. in March 1969, Florida, Gregg was summoned to join Duane and the other musicians – Dickey Betts (guitar), Berry Oakley (bass), Butch Trucks (drums) and Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson (drums) – comprising the Allman Brothers Band’s earliest incarnation

A major setback in his life was the tragic death of his brother. who died in a bike accident. Allman described in his speech that how he dealt with that tragedy and carried on with life, like they say “The show must go on.” It’s worth revisiting those words today.

“WHEN I GOT OVER BEING ANGRY, I PRAYED TO HIM TO FORGIVE ME, AND I REALIZED THAT MY BROTHER HAD A BLAST. […] NOT THAT I GOT OVER IT—I STILL AIN’T GOTTEN OVER IT. I DON’T KNOW WHAT GETTING OVER IT MEANS, REALLY. I DON’T STAND AROUND CRYING ANYMORE, BUT I THINK ABOUT HIM EVERY DAY OF MY LIFE. […] MAYBE A LOT OF LEARNING HOW TO GRIEVE WAS THAT I HAD TO GROW UP A LITTLE BIT AND REALIZE THAT DEATH IS PART OF LIFE. NOW I CAN TALK TO MY BROTHER IN THE MORNING, AND HE ANSWERS ME AT NIGHT. I’VE OPENED MYSELF TO HIS DEATH AND ACCEPTED IT, AND I THINK THAT’S THE GRIEVING PROCESS AT WORK.”

Here is his famous song Midnight Rider

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